Category Archives: Audio Return Channel

Ways to Boost iPhone WiFi Signal (in iOS 7.x) on iPhone/iPad

It is not often that you face WiFi issues on the iPhone. Apple designed the smartphone to latch onto an ae network pretty good. But there are always exceptions. It is not hard to boost the Wi-fi signal reception/strength on the iPhone when it feels like things are slowing down.

Here are few point one can try and follow to enhance the signal quality:
Restart Everything

  • Restarting a router is one of the first things you ought to try. As simplistic and silly as it sounds, restarting a router/Wi-fi modem clears a few clogs within the system. Restarting a router after letting it be switched-off for about a minute can actually work wonders if you have been facing intermittent WiFi issues. While you are at it, you might also want to restart Wi-fi on your iPhone. You just have to turn off the toggle, wait for a minute and then switch it on.

Case On/Off

  • Have got a case on your iPhone. That could be interfering with the WiFi reception. No case is designed to block the Wi-fi – at least, not consciously. Since most cases are TPU, plastic or silicone rubber, they have no effect on the reception but if you’re using a case that goes a bit beyond these materials, it might cause an issue. The easiest thing to do, in this case, would be to remove the case-cover off your iPhone and test the WiFi reception

Setup DNS Manually on iPhone/iPad

  • Setting up a manual DNS in iPhone’s WiFi preferences is known to create a massive difference. Sometimes, it’s not about the Wi-fi reception at all. Technically, by altering the DNS setting, we’re not boosting the WiFi reception. We’re only going through some other DNS to fetch data from the internet.

Interference from Neighboring Signals – Change the Channel

  • One of the biggest issues in a neighbourhood with lots of WiFi networks is interference. It’s hard to exactly quantify or measure the impact of neighboring Wi-Fi signals but your iPhone’s Wi-fi latching technology works this way: it pings for the strongest signal and catches on to it.
  • The strong 2.4 GHz signal that most routers operate on a lot of channels. If you are in the US, you can pick a channel between 1, 6 and 11 or if you’re outside, pick from 1, 5, 9 and 13. There are softwares that detect Wi-fi signals from your neighborhood and tell you what channel these are on. You can then configure your WiFi to stream through another channel.

weboost
Get a New Router
Although the possibility of your router being the source of all WiFi troubles on your iPhone is very less, it does happen. A new router can fix this.
Routers usually don’t go berserk. In the off-chance that they do, it’s hard to figure out if it’s the router that’s causing the poor signal issue. One efficient way of finding it out is to use a spare router and test it for a couple of days. If WiFi strength is good and stable on the iPhone using the alternative router, you can say that your router has got problems.
This long omni-directional antenna is the best performing dual band antenna on the market.
The SC-100-L is a fiberglass, omni-directional antenna ideal for providing coverage for large buildings and warehouses. It is commonly used with SureCall dual band amplifiers. Provides 9 dB gain for 2G/3G coverage.
For best results, the antenna should be mounted in an upright position.
Mount the entire assembly to a 1 to 2 inch diameter pole (not included). The antenna should be mounted with the chrome tip pointing toward the sky (perpendicular to the ground). The white fiberglass portion of the antenna should be mounted above the roof line and unobstructed in all directions.
The SureCall Dual-band Omni-directional Long Antenna (SC-100-L) is compatible with the following networks:
Verizon
AT&T
Sprint
T Mobile

HDMI ARC

The Audio Return Channel in HDMI 1.4 enables a TV, via a single HDMI cable, to send audio data “upstream” to an A/V receiver or surround audio controller, increasing user flexibility and eliminating the need for any separate S/PDIF audio connection.

TVs have always been able to receive multi-channel audio through an HDMI connection, and this is still a typical use-case, with the TV positioned “downstream” from content sources and any connected audio equipment. However, if a user had a TV with a built-in tuner or DVD player, and wanted to send content “upstream” from the TV back to the audio system, a separate connection had to be installed, typically an S/PDIF cable.

An ARC-enabled TV can either send or receive audio via HDMI, upstream or downstream, depending on system set-up and user preferences.

LipSync functionality, introduced in HDMI 1.3, ensures that the audio stays matched to the video, automatically compensating for any processor delays whether the audio is traveling upstream or downstream.

 

ARC, uses a single HDMI connection to send audio from a TV to the sound bar or AV receiver.

In theory, ARC is supposed to let you have one connection between your TV and whatever you use to create sound: a receiver or a sound bar. You send video to the TV with an HDMI cable, and that same HDMI cable sends audio from the TV back down the same cable.

This is great for smart TVs, where the TV itself is creating the audio (via apps like Netflix and Pandora). Instead of suffering through a TV’s terrible speakers, the audio gets sent to the receiver/sound bar for a massive improvement in sound quality.

Another way this is great is if you have multiple sources (Blu-ray, cable box, Roku), but only one input on your sound bar. With ARC, you can connect everything to the TV, and the TV will send audio down an HDMI cable to the sound bar. No extra cables needed (i.e. an optical cable).

Audio Return Channel is convenient and can simplify your setup. However, it might also mean you don’t get surround sound, and it definitely means you won’t get the high-resolution audio formats from Blu-ray.

So for the best sound quality, it’s still recommended to use individual HDMI cables to link to a sound bar or receiver when you can.

To check ARC functionality, one can:

  • Look for devices that feature Audio Return Channel functionality.
  • All HDMI cables will support Audio Return Channel functionality when connected to Audio Return Channel-enabled devices. You can use your existing HDMI cables or choose a different cable type.
  • Connect your devices through Audio Return Channel-enabled HDMI ports. HDMI Licensing has strongly recommended that Adopters label all Audio Return Channel-compliant HDMI ports with the letters “ARC” for easy identification, but does not require manufacturers to do so. Please check with your manufacturer to determine which HDMI ports (if any) will support Audio Return Channel functionality.